The Traffic Question

I have lived in Dayton for 28 years, all of them in the last house on the left on Shady Lane. We have 17 families in the neighborhood. From my house until I reach Dayton Road, there are no stop signs or much traffic. When I get to Dayton Road, there is seldom any traffic, unless I plan my trip at the ending of a Dayton United Methodist Church service. Even then, folks tend to have conversations and dawdle about, so not everyone leaves at the same time. Once, there were 3 cars in front of me and 2 cars behind me on Dayton Road, but that was on a Sunday when I blended in with the Methodists.

I once had to sit at the highway for 48 seconds when trying to turn from northbound Dayton Road to westbound Indiana 38. Forty eight seconds! Usually, it is lonely at the crossroads. And that is the point of this post. Remember all of those taxes that you pay each year, or twice a year? (You pay monthly as part of your rental fee if you aren't the property owner, you can be sure.) That tax money is distributed by federal and state and local agencies. The local folks at Area Plan Commission (APC) and the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) conduct studies regularly on roads to determine the amount of traffic, the type of traffic, and plans for upgrading roads to match the needs. APC and INDOT transparently share their findings through their proper use of our tax funds.

One of the studies is focused on average annual daily traffic (AADT). Using an automated counter, the number of vehicles passing a point is tabulated. A further study is conducted in high traffic areas for design hour volume (DHV) to determine peak times in morning and afternoon. DHV was a major element of the Hoosier Heartland planning. It doesn't apply for the level of traffic that we have in Dayton.

 The counts are so small that INDOT doesn't even conduct Design Hour Volume (DHV) studies. Sometimes, a couple of cars  per minute  travel the roadways.

The counts are so small that INDOT doesn't even conduct Design Hour Volume (DHV) studies. Sometimes, a couple of cars per minute travel the roadways.

Above, INDOT data from 2004 to 2016 in five areas around our lovely little town are shown.

 No, Dayton Road South will never look like this, despite the dismal visions uttered by a handful of people. The picture is folly, the numbers and charts are absolutely real.

No, Dayton Road South will never look like this, despite the dismal visions uttered by a handful of people. The picture is folly, the numbers and charts are absolutely real.

Dayton Road north of 375S is the section from South Street or the railroad tracks and south of town. The highest level of traffic was in 2016, though the trend upward is not large. Since DHV was not conducted, the approximate traffic of 45 cars per hour was calculated by this formula: (AADT/2)/10. This accounts for outbound and inbound trips in a period from 7 am to 5pm. The number of cars per hour drops to 30 if the timeframe is 6am to 9pm.

Dayton Road south of 200 S is the section north of Deerfield and Prestwick. The highest level of traffic was in 2016. Using the formula above, the approximate traffic level is 68 cars to 46 cars per hour, depending on the timeframe noted above. One car per minute on the north end is hardly the traffic that some suggest.

What do you think? Will only 110 houses in the new neighborhood change your travel plans? Why? Thanks for lending Your Voice to the conversation.

 

 

 

Dave LeiningerComment